Does anyone know the poem ‘The Dead’ by Rupert Brooke?





I am doing an essay on it, and I know that it's celebrating war, but I'm having trouble with individual lines. And there's a question about the tone of the poem and I have to give examples, I just don't know what the language means and I'm having trouble with the poem,So if anyone knows the poem, could they let me know?



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2 Answers to “Does anyone know the poem ‘The Dead’ by Rupert Brooke?”

  1. foregoer says:

    The DeadRupert BrookeBlow out, you bugles, over the rich Dead! There’s none of these so lonely and poor of old, But, dying, has made us rarer gifts than gold. These laid the world away; poured out the red Sweet wine of youth; gave up the years to be Of work and joy, and that unhoped serene, That men call age; and those who would have been, Their sons, they gave, their immortality.Blow, bugles, blow! They brought us, for our dearth, Holiness, lacked so long, and Love, and Pain, Honour has come back, as a king, to earth, And paid his subjects with a royal wage; And Nobleness walks in our ways again; And we have come into our heritage. IV. THE DEADThese hearts were woven of human joys and cares, Washed marvellously with sorrow, swift to mirth. The years had given them kindness. Dawn was theirs, And sunset, and the colours of the earth. These had seen movement, and heard music; known Slumber and waking; loved; gone proudly friended; Felt the quick stir of wonder; sat alone; Touched flowers and furs and cheeks. All this is ended.There are waters blown by changing winds to laughter And lit by the rich skies, all day. And after, Frost, with a gesture, stays the waves that dance And wandering loveliness. He leaves a white Unbroken glory, a gathered radiance, A width, a shining peace, under the night————————————–…

  2. biela's says:

    He is not celebrating war. He is honoring those that gave the ultimate sacrifice in war.”Blow out, you bugles, over the rich Dead!”By commanding the bugles to blow “over the rich Dead”, Brooke is commanding that a tribute of honor be given to those that gave their lives in war.” There’s none of these so lonely and poor of old,”He describes those who have died as perhaps having been lonely or poor in life.” But, dying, has made us rarer gifts than gold.”In lines 2 and 3, he’s saying, “No matter how lonely or poor they might have been in life, they are rich in death.” He says they are rich, not because of what they have, but because of what they have given. By giving their lives in war, they gave “us” (meaning those they died for) gifts rarer (more precious) than gold.”These laid the world away; poured out the red”Sweet wine of youth; gave up the years to be” Of work and joy, and that unhoped serene,” That men call age; and those who would have been,”Their sons, they gave, their immortality.”Here, Brooke lists things that the Dead sacrificed: the world their blood the future years they would have had to spend in work and joy the serenity of old age the opportunity of having their own children” Blow, bugles, blow! They brought us, for our dearth,” Holiness, lacked so long, and Love, and Pain.” Honour has come back, as a king, to earth,” And paid his subjects with a royal wage;” And Nobleness walks in our ways again;” And we have come into our heritage.”Here, he lists what they gave by their sacrifice: Holiness Love and Pain (these symbolize the ups and downs of life, meaning that they preserved, for those they died for, the chance to experience these things) Honor, and the good things, or royal wage, that come with it, described by the words “nobility” and “heritage”" These hearts were woven of human joys and cares”Washed marvellously with sorrow, swift to mirth.” The years had given them kindness. Dawn was theirs,”And sunset, and the colours of the earth.” These had seen movement and heard music; known”Slumber and waking; loved; gone proudly friended;” Felt the quick stir of wonder; sat alone;”Touched flowers and furs and cheeks. All this is ended.”Here, Brooke talks about the kinds of experiences they had while they lived, showing that in those things they were just like everyone else. The difference being that, for them, “all this,” or the experience of life, “is ended.”" There are waters blown by changing winds to laughter”In the final stanza, Brooke uses imagery to describe the general result on their society of the sacrifice they made. The changing winds are the changing of the season of war to a happier season, or one of “laughter”.” And lit by the rich skies, all day. And after,”The “rich skies” reflecting in (or lighting) the water has many meanings, but the general idea is partially that now that the storm (or war) that was in the sky is past, things below (in everyday life) are better (lit). This line also begins the metaphor of day and night, which also has several meanings, including a continuation of the cycle of life, but which essentially boil down to:Day = Rejoicing of the living, or happiness for future possibilities assured for the living by the sacrifices of the deadNight = somber and reverent feelings of the living for the dead”Frost, with a gesture, stays the waves that dance” And wandering loveliness. He leaves a white”Unbroken glory, a gathered radiance,” A width, a shining peace, under the night.”Here, Brooke uses the idea of Frost to symbolize two things: the warriors’ death and the beauty of what resulted from it. That the Frost “stays the waves that dance” means that their sacrifice inspires somber and reverent feelings. The “white unbroken glory”, “gathered radiance”, and “shining peace” that the Frost leaves refer to the honor discussed earlier.I hope this was helpful.